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Cake day: June 11th, 2023

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  • I think Burnham was referencing Book, not Tyler, when she said she knows what it’s like to lose someone but got him back.

    I suppose you could interpret it that way, but I just don’t see it myself.

    Book died during the final events of 10C, but they magically zapped him back into existence, if I recall correctly.

    Book didn’t die, he was transporting out, and the 10C were able to capture his transporter pattern, and then later resolve it.






  • He insisted that even though he is gay, the Sulu he portrayed is straight.

    “Unfortunately, it’s a twisting of Gene’s creation, to which he put in so much thought. I think it’s really unfortunate.”

    Takei was not into it, but I do feel like he was overselling just how much thought Roddenberry put into the side characters in Trek. Sulu didn’t even get a given name until “The Voyage Home”, a film Roddenberry had nothing to do with.

    (In Generations, Sulu is married and has a daughter, Demora, who helmed the Enterprise-B.)

    Demora is Sulu’s daughter, but there’s no mention that Sulu was married, or if he was that it was to a woman.

    (and Cho himself is cool being a straight Korean playing a gay Japanese)

    Funny you mention the character’s nationality, considering that Roddenberry envisioned Sulu as some pan-Asian character on indeterminate nationality. Sulu is not a Japanese name, and Roddenberry chose to name the character after the Sulu sea of the coast of the Philippians.

    Please don’t assume that I thought otherwise just because I didn’t explicitly mention every potentiality in that one post.

    That was not my assumption. I just can’t think of any reason to assume that Sulu is not bi or pan, given what we know about the various iterations of the character.



  • USSBurritoTruck@startrek.websiteOPMtoRisa@startrek.websiteAn important reminder
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    20 days ago

    Ah, well that question has been answered by others and myself elsewhere in this thread. Sorry for assuming that you might have checked to see if your question was already answered before asking it.

    But hey, just for you, I’ll repost what I’ve already said:

    Because the police enforce the laws of the state, often with violence. If the law dictates that a person being open about their identity is illegal regardless of the fact their identity harms no one, and everyone involved in their actions consents, than it is the responsibility of the cops to oppress them. One year the cops might march alongside people at pride, and then the laws might change and they’ll be there to bust heads of anyone who shows up the next year. 
     
    And yeah, there no doubt exist LGBTQ+ cops, or cops whose friends and/or family whom they love are LGBTQ+, but so long as they wear the uniform they represent an organization used to oppress marginalized and minority communities. 
     
    Fundamentally, pride is not just a party, it is a protest.



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    20 days ago

    “No cops at pride” is not about the prejudices of individual cops, be they fictional future shapeshifters from half a galaxy away, or real police here and now. There are LGBTQ+ cops out there.

    The issue is the fact that cops enforce the law regardless of how just the law might be. Odo was the chief of security aboard Terek Nor while it was under Cardassian control, and while in that role rushed three innocent Bajoran workers to execution so he could maintain order aboard the station.

    Even once the station became Bajoran owned and Starfleet operated, Odo was still willing to conduct illegal surveillance, lock people in the detention facility on trumped up charges, and impose a strict curfew. Personally I don’t think it would be too much of a stretch to assume that Odo would be willing to lock up people participating in a Pride event for no other reason than that he was told to do so, and they were causing a minor disruption on the Promenade.



  • Prime Sulu is straight and Kelvin Sulu is gay

    Do we know that prime Sulu is straight? He flirts with a woman in “The Way to Eden” and when the literal devil from Christen mythology is aboard the Enterprise in “The Magiks of Megas-Tu” Sulu is able to conjure a woman using the magical properties.

    Mirror Sulu clearly is interested in Uhura, despite her rebuffs.

    And we do see Kelvin Sulu ever so briefly with his husband and child in “Beyond”, causing an uproar well out of proportion to how little the movie choose to show.

    However, all those characters might be bisexual. We do exist.

    Even while it was still on the air, I assumed Prime Kira was closeted and that was part of why none of her relationships worked out.

    People have relationships that don’t work out without being queer.

    But yeah, prime Kira is a religious conservative who is grossed out by how libertine Dax is – dating Ferengi, and dudes with transparent skulls – and while we’re never told how Bajorans view queer relationships, I do view mirror Kira’s more unrestrained nature as indication that her prime counterpart is holding back a part of herself.




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    20 days ago

    Because that’s what the artist decided to draw. Maybe Kira has it for someone she knows who identifies as a lesbian. Maybe she was just getting into the spirit of things and grabbed the first flag she saw.

    Obviously I’m canon Kira only expresses interest in dudes with the personalities of dry toast, but mirror Kira is a bit more open. It’s not entirely clear if sexual orientation is 1:1 across universes, so who’s to say if prime Kira experiences same sex attraction or not?


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    20 days ago

    Because the police enforce the laws of the state, often with violence. If the law dictates that a person being open about their identity is illegal regardless of the fact their identity harms no one, and everyone involved in their actions consents, than it is the responsibility of the cops to oppress them. One year the cops might march alongside people at pride, and then the laws might change and they’ll be there to bust heads of anyone who shows up the next year.

    And yeah, there no doubt exist LGBTQ+ cops, or cops whose friends and/or family whom they love are LGBTQ+, but so long as they wear the uniform they represent an organization used to oppress marginalized and minority communities.

    Fundamentally, pride is not just a party, it is a protest.